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The whys of rising obesity

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 13

A panel discussion held by the Forum at Harvard School of Public Health probed the reasons for the modern epidemic of overeating and its particularly harmful effects on children, who are especially susceptible to food marketing.

Retiring CIA Official Michael Morell Joins Belfer Center as Senior Fellow

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Sep 13

Retiring CIA Official Michael Morell will be joining Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center as a Senior Fellow

What Wall Street Wants to See From Twitter’s Executives (and Why It’s Wrong)

Harvard Business Review - Sep 13

All eyes are on Twitter, with last night’s announcement that it has filed an S-1 in order to go public. Between now and the IPO, every bit of information about the company’s finances and other metrics will be closely scrutinized. You can expect to see endless discussions in the press about revenue, valuation, user growth, and product. But one key variable is missing from that list: people. It’s not just the company’s metrics that investors are interested in. Research shows that ...

Beyond belief

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 13

A panel of scholars gathered at Harvard Divinity School to discuss “Studying Religion in the Post-9/11 World: The Importance of Taking Religion Seriously from a Humanities Perspective in Troubled Times.”

Why We Didn’t Learn Enough From the Financial Crisis

Harvard Business Review - Sep 13

“Liquidate labor, liquidate stocks, liquidate real estate,” Treasury Secretary Andrew Mellon may or may not have told Herbert Hoover in the early years of the Great Depression. “It will purge the rottenness out of of the system.” This is what has since become known as the “Austrian” view (although most of its modern proselytizers are American): economic actors need to learn from their mistakes, “ malinvestment ” must be punished, busts are needed to wring out the excesses created during ...

Berkman Buzz: September 13, 2013

Berkman Center - Newsfeed - Sep 13

The Berkman Buzz is selected weekly from the posts of Berkman Center people and projects . To subscribe, click here . Sara Watson reflects on anxiety, hope, and her first days as a Berkman Fellow Yesterday was my first day as a Berkman Fellow. The day was full of excited, passionate conversation about all the things we care about, finding potential points of intersection and collaboration, and making fast friends. But throughout my conversations yesterday, I sensed some underlying anxiety, some tension. We ...

How I Got My Team To Fail More

Harvard Business Review - Sep 13

Business-school literature has long stressed the importance of taking risks and encouraging rapid failure. In the real world of quarterly numbers, though, embracing failure mostly remains a throwaway line in CEO speeches. At PBS Digital, we went beyond corporate lip service and demanded failure from each and every employee. The results? The transformation of a venerated but legacy brand into a digital leader. The story of our decision to create and embrace a failure metric begins, as do many business ...

When You’re Innovating, Resist Looking for Solutions

Harvard Business Review - Sep 13

If someone comes to you with a problem, you start thinking of a solution. That’s natural — everyone does it. But as soon as you start thinking of a solution, you unconsciously begin shutting off possibilities for getting a deeper understanding of the problem and therefore of finding a truly breakthrough solution. That’s why it can often be more productive to avoid “solutions” thinking when a problem arises. It’s better to stay in what we call the “problem space” ...

Don’t Sugarcoat Negative Feedback

Harvard Business Review - Sep 13

The old rap against coaches and consultants: they borrow your watch to tell you the time. And yet I’d bet anything that 90% of the coaches reading this hung out their shingles with an eye toward helping executives grow and overcome impediments to success. So why do they bear the stigma of being a cajoling cheerleader rather than a conscientious change agent? The answer is that, in the same way that hungry rats learn to navigate the blind alleys of a maze in their search for food, coaches, ...

Drink Your Way into the Middle Class

Harvard Business Review - Sep 13

Straight Up How Johnnie Walker Conquered the World Foreign Policy Foreign Policy

At a gathering of Beijing techies, on a cruise up the Nile, at a four-day wedding in Jaipur, or among members of Iraq’s Baath Party. These are all places where Johnnie Walker whiskey has been poured — and, according to Afshin Molavi, the Scotch whisky's global reach is only expanding. This delightful tour through the history and marketing of the  “amber restorative” is a blueprint for how to use our aspirational ...

The Right Way to Rally Your Troops

Harvard Business Review - Sep 13

Leaders face enormous public and employee scrutiny when their companies are failing. Many have to measure their success in terms of stock price and market share, and when those slip, everyone sees it happening, reads about it in the business pages, watches it on CNBC. How do the best CEOs confront that challenge? When the heat is on, and pressure intense, how do they rally their troops? For 10 years, I worked as a consultant to John Emery, CEO of Emery Worldwide, now part of UPS. Every six months, we ...

David Landes

Greg Mankiw's Blog - Sep 13

Here isthe NY Times obituary of the great Harvard economic historian .

Shopping around

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 13

The start of a new semester signals many things, one of which is "shopping week," where undergraduates sit in on classes and check out syllabi before committing to a course.

Why Organizations Should Embrace Randomness Like Ant Colonies

Harvard Business Review - Sep 13

Consider the common ant. Each one is by genetic design capable of only a few simple behaviors and binary choices, making it a pretty dumb, rigid, inflexible being. Yet the collective behavior of an ant colony is adaptive, flexible and even creative; it’s a highly structured social organization. Now consider your average human. Most of us are individually adaptive, flexible and very creative. Yet the large organizations in which we work are often inflexible and incapable of adaptation and true ...

The One Thing VCs Could Do Immediately to Increase Returns

Harvard Business Review - Sep 13

If the person who can cure diabetes came to you for money, if you were a VC you’d likely turn that person away. And, an inventor who could reduce global dependency on oil by designing better batteries? That VC might not even take the meeting. By venture capitalists’ individual actions, they are limiting growth and innovation. By their collective choices, they are risking our very lives. Now that might sound a little extreme. But bear with me. Ted Schlein, general partner at Kleiner Perkins, was ...

Do You Buy Stocks Just in Time for the Dividends? You’re Not Alone

Harvard Business Review - Sep 13

Companies have significantly higher stock returns in months when they’re expected to issue dividends, because dividend-seeking investors buy stock in the days leading up to the expected payment, say Samuel M. Hartzmark and David H. Solomon of the University of Southern California. A portfolio that bought all stocks of companies that were expected to issue dividends in a given month would earn abnormal returns of 41 basis points , the researchers say. But beware: Significant negative returns are seen ...

Peering into the Fogg

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 13

Harvard Art Museums officials offered an early look at the progress of the renovation and expansion project that will unite the Fogg, Busch-Reisinger, and Sackler museums under one roof.

The Fogg Pulls Back the Curtain

Harvard Magazine - Sep 13

In early September , several reporters were invited to tour the new Harvard Art Museums building that has risen at 32 Quincy Street. The façade of the old Fogg museum still stands facing Sever Quadrangle. But the museum behind it, which is still very much under construction and will not reopen until the fall of 2014, has been reinvented at a cost previously estimated at $350 million. “We are going to unleash the collection, put it to more imaginative uses within the context of a university,” Tom Lentz ...

Group Think Is the Kryptonite of Leadership

Harvard Business Review - Sep 13

Let’s be honest: for the most part, we gravitate toward people who hold a lot of the same beliefs that we do. It’s human nature. But for anyone in a leadership position, this basic human urge can also be your kryptonite. If you surround yourself with too many like-minded colleagues, that is, you can create a culture of group think. That’s not good. Just take a look back at U.S. history. Lyndon Johnson’s escalation of military action in Vietnam, John F. Kennedy’s invasion of ...

Leading Across Sectors

Harvard Business Review - Sep 12

William D. Eggers and Paul Macmillan , authors of The Solution Revolution , discuss why “triple-strength” leaders are the best problem solvers. Download this podcast

Five Mistakes to Avoid When Managing Digital Teams

Harvard Business Review - Sep 12

As digital becomes part of every line of business, effective marshaling of digital capabilities is a critical competency. Management is often maligned (sometimes for good reason!), but strong management is an important differentiator in both digital delivery and in aligning that delivery to strategic goals. So what’s the best way to tackle management of digital teams to keep engagement and output high? I’ve been through two Internet booms and busts in corporations, nonprofits, and startups — ...

The good life, longer

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 12

By synthesizing the data collected in multiple government-sponsored health surveys conducted in recent decades, researchers from the National Bureau of Economic Research, Harvard University, and the University of Massachusetts were able to measure how the quality-adjusted life expectancy of Americans has changed over time.

Volatile Syria

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 12

Moderator Graham Allison went straight to the heart of the matter during an Institute of Politics forum on Syria at the Kennedy School, asking the four panelists for a yes or no vote on military force.

Attacking Syria; Yes or No?, A Panel Discussion

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Sep 12

A Harvard Kennedy School panel discussion.

Welcome to the 72-Hour Work Week

Harvard Business Review - Sep 12

How many hours do you think the average American professional works each week? If you think 40, 50 or even 60, think again. For many, 72 hours is the new norm. In a recent survey of 483 executives, managers, and professionals (EMPs), we found that 60% of those who carry smartphones for work are connected to their jobs 13.5 or more hours a day on weekdays and about five hours on weekends, for a total of about 72 hours. Assuming these people sleep about seven and a half hours a night, that leaves only three ...

Kennedy School Forum Debates U.S. Military Action in Syria

Harvard Magazine - Sep 12

Whether or not to take military action in Syria was the debate topic at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) on September 11 as a panel of faculty specialists—including Oman professor of international relations R. Nicholas Burns , Tisch professor of history Niall Ferguson , Distinguished Service Professor and former dean Joseph S. Nye Jr. , and international security program fellow Marisa L. Porges —discussed President Barack Obama’s proposal to take military action in Syria following that government’s use ...

The building blocks of planets

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 12

Harvard’s Matt Holman, a lecturer on astrophysics, and his collaborators at the Southwest Research Institute in Colorado are piggybacking their research onto a NASA spaceship that is racing to the farthest edges of the solar system to study objects in the far-flung Kuiper Belt.

Is beautiful really usable? (9/17); Curated by the Crowd (9/24); A Global Research Agenda for Children’s Rights

Berkman Center - Newsfeed - Sep 12

Berkman Events Newsletter Template Upcoming Events / Digital Media September 12, 2013 berkman luncheon series Is beautiful really usable? Understanding how aesthetics and usability influence user experience. Tuesday, September 17 , 12:30pm ET, Harvard Law School. Ever come across a product that looked beautiful but was awful to use? Or stumbled over a something that was ugly as hell but just did exactly what you wanted? Ever wondered how these factors work together, and how they influence the experiences ...

Club Passim plays to its Harvard audience

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 12

Club Passim remains a vital part of the Harvard Square scene, as well as a venue that has attracted Harvard students for decades.

How to Use Psychometric Testing in Hiring

Harvard Business Review - Sep 12

Roughly 18% of companies currently use personality tests in the hiring process, according to a survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management. This number is growing at a rate of 10-15% a year according to many industrial and organizational psychologists, as well as the Association for Test Publishers. When used correctly, cognitive and personality tests can increase the chances that new employees will succeed. Since the cost of a bad hire is widely estimated to be at least one year’s ...

Research: Middle Managers Have an Outsized Impact on Innovation

Harvard Business Review - Sep 12

Just the mention of “middle managers” is enough to make people’s eyes roll back. But these supposedly boring cogs of the corporation, these objects of derision in Dilbertland, can have a profound impact on innovation and performance. Companies need to pay attention to them and reward their special talent at making the best of the restrictions and limitations of their positions — of making lemonade from lemons. For decades, researchers and businesspeople have assumed that in the thick of ...

Digital Media Law Project Announces a New Survey of Media Credentialing Practices

Berkman Center - Newsfeed - Sep 12

The Digital Media Law Project at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society, together with the Investigative News Network , the National Press Photographers Association , Free Press , Journalist’s Resource , and the Nieman Journalism Lab , is pleased to announce the launch of a new study on media credentialing. We invite newsgatherers of all types to participate. Even as the very concept of journalism evolves to accommodate dramatic new ways of gathering and interacting with information ...

Nigeria’s Big Gamble on One Indigenous Entrepreneur

Harvard Business Review - Sep 12

Aliko Dangote, Africa’s wealthiest man , recently signed a multi-billion dollar contract to build Nigeria’s largest oil refinery , and turn the oil-rich country into a petroleum exporter. The promise of job creation — the refinery project is expected to employ 8,000 engineers and create jobs for 85,000 Nigerians — has excited many commentators. But there are further reasons for optimism, and lessons for companies looking to understand the power of indigenous entrepreneurs in emerging ...

Faculty Council meeting held Sept. 11

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 12

On Sept. 11, the Faculty Council welcomed new members, reviewed history and policies, elected subcommittees for 2013-14, discussed the work of the council in the new academic year, and discussed proposed changes to the Q Guide.

Piecing Together Egypt’s Rupture

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Sep 12

Brotherhood’s downfall had roots in electoral success, analyst says

On Closer Inspection, Not Such a Plain Jane

Radcliffe Institute - Sep 12

Lepore uncovers the story of Benjamin Franklin’s sister Harvard Gazette September 12, 2013 On closer inspection, not such a plain Jane By Sarah Sweeney, Harvard Staff Writer Jill Lepore uncovers the story of Benjamin Franklin’s sister.

Decision Making, Top Gun Style

Harvard Business Review - Sep 12

When Tom Cruise’s “Maverick” inverted his F-14 fighter jet and gave “the bird” to his Soviet opponent in the opening scene of 1986′s Top Gun , Cruise assured himself a lighthearted place in the history of the Cold War. What that scene also did, however, was provide one of cinematography’s great examples of a key concept of air-to-air combat: the OODA loop. Maverick’s uncanny ability to move rapidly through a complex decision cycle, always ending up in a ...

Investors Will Like Your Company Better if You Shorten Its Name

Harvard Business Review - Sep 12

On average, companies with short, simple names attract more shareholders, generate greater amounts of stock trading, and perform better on certain financial measures than companies with hard-to-process names such as National Oilwell Varco and Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold, say T. Clifton Green of Emory University and Russell E. Jame of the University of Kentucky. A 1-step increase in name “fluency” on a 5-step scale, such as reducing name length by 1 word , is associated with a 2.53% increase ...

The End of Banks as We Know Them?

Harvard Business Review - Sep 12

Last week my father received a phone call from the branch director of his long-standing bank to offer him a new product. My father, instead of listening with confidence to the advice of a trustworthy agent, was immediately suspicious. He dreaded another 30-page prospectus full of small print — and another potential trap. My father’s experience is mirrored all over the world. Millions of people have lost confidence in banks. But the dissatisfaction and disappointment with our banks runs deeper. The ...

Who predicted the sluggish economy?

Greg Mankiw's Blog - Sep 12

Robert P. Murphy looks back .

Randall Kennedy probes the 'variousness' of charged racial issues

HLS News - Sep 12

The interaction of race and legal institutions is Harvard Law School Professor Randall Kennedy's niche; this is how he describes the approach he's used in his classes and five books: "Here's this deep, complex, troubling, anxiety-producing subject. Let's really go at it. Let's not be afraid of it. Let's turn it over and take a look at what your opponents have to say. There were people who believed slavery was a positive good, and that segregation was a positive good. Who were they? Let's really be precise, ...

The Best Leaders Are Both Tough and Nice

Harvard Business Review - Sep 11

Leaders often ask themselves whether it’s best to be tough or nice. If you’re tough — a “driver” — you can push people to go beyond the limits of their abilities. If you’re nice — an “enhancer” — you can better understand the needs, problems, and concerns of your charges. It’s a hard choice. So which style results in the more highly-engaged employees? According study of 160,576 employees under the command 30,661 bosses, the ...

Apple’s iPhone Pricing Strategy: Good, Not Great

Harvard Business Review - Sep 11

With yesterday’s iPhone release, Apple changed things up by going to a “ good-better-best ” pricing strategy on its new devices. As it always does, the company showcased a new and improved iPhone model — the 5S — which provides faster processing, a better camera, and James Bond-like fingerprint security technology . Prices for the 5S in the U.S. start at $199 for customers who commit to a 24 month contract, and $649 for those who prefer not to be tied to a two-year financial ...

Lifting the ‘family curse’

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 11

Removing a woman’s healthy breasts might seem like a radical response to fears of breast cancer. But for women with genetic mutations that put them at high risk of developing the disease, it’s a step that can cut their vulnerability by 90 to 95 percent.

First HKS HarvardX Course Lets Students Advise on National Security Challenges

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Sep 11

Graham Allison, David Sanger to teach online course on national security and the press

On closer inspection, not such a plain Jane

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 11

In her latest work, “Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin,” Jill Lepore, a professor of U.S. history at Harvard and a staff writer for The New Yorker, brings Benjamin Franklin’s sister out of history’s fog and into the open.

The “Instant Referendum” That’s Undermining Your Leadership

Harvard Business Review - Sep 11

Outgoing New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg knows more than a thing or two about running huge, complicated organizations and digital media. So when he notes in a farewell interview that, thanks to social media, there’s now “an instant referendum on everything; I think it’s going to make governing more difficult,” private sector managers better get nervous, too. The Arab Spring and other Twitter-credited uprisings get virtually all the headlines, but the C-suites and high-profile ...

To market, to market

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 11

For several Fridays, dozens of local artists, crafters, and designers from Boston’s SoWa Open Market will be selling their wares at the Science Center Plaza.

The Right Way to Find a Career Sponsor

Harvard Business Review - Sep 11

As part of her employer’s mentoring program, every month Willa meets one-on-one with Joan, a former EVP at the same global financial services firm. Warm and nurturing, Joan is a tireless champion of working mothers like Willa, having herself negotiated a flex arrangement working out of her home in Connecticut while overseeing operations in India. Joan is unquestionably Willa’s role model as well as mentor. But is she the senior leader best positioned to get Willa promoted to her dream job of ...

What’s the Status of Your Relationship With Innovation?

Harvard Business Review - Sep 11

How important is innovation these days? Increasingly important, if one goes by the frequency of the word appearing during earnings calls that publicly traded companies have with investment analysts. In 2008, the word appeared 1,733 times in earnings calls for 435 large publicly traded companies. That’s an average of about four mentions per company (Starbucks topped the list with 139 mentions). In the last four quarters where full data are available, the total was 3,299, or about 7.5 mentions per ...

Cracking the Mobile Advertising Code

Harvard Business Review - Sep 11

“Mobile first.” That phrase is increasingly shaping marketing decisions, and for good reason. In 2012, $10 billion in sales were made through mobile channels. That’s expected to rise to $30 billion by 2016. In addition, 55 percent of smartphone owners use their smart phones to research purchases. Those numbers have mobile advertisers salivating. But they need to focus on real opportunities and not false hopes. The Achilles’ heel of mobile apps While consumers are spending more time ...

Building a Minimum Viable Product? You’re Probably Doing it Wrong

Harvard Business Review - Sep 11

In creating a minimum viable product , entrepreneurs choose between experiments that can validate or invalidate their assumptions about a business model. If your MVP is a worse product than your imagined final version, success validates your idea; failure, on the other hand, doesn’t necessarily invalidate it. If your MVP offers a better experience, then failure invalidates your business model; success doesn’t necessarily validate it. Unfortunately, we usually pick the wrong kind of MVP: we tend ...

Lhota Hopes to Capitalize on Elite Dismay Over a Liberal Tilt

HBS Bulletin - Sep 11

The angst in New York City, emanating from charity galas and Park Avenue dinner tables, has created an unexpected political opening for Joseph J. Lhota, the Republican nominee for mayor, whose once-sleepy candidacy is now viewed by players in both parties as their last, best hope for salvaging the business-friendly government of the Bloomberg era. Read More >

Nadal Is Strong Enough to Cry. Are You?

Harvard Business Review - Sep 11

Rafael Nadal, who just won the U.S. Open for the second time, is my hero. His athleticism is extraordinary. His focus is awe-inspiring. His skill is, clearly, second to none. His will is unremitting. It’s a joy to watch him in competition. Yet those are not the reasons he’s my hero. In fact, it wasn’t until after he was finished playing in this year’s final that he rose to role model in my book. So what was it? It was that, right after winning, he fell to the ground, crying, then ...

Every Leader Needs a Challenger in Chief

Harvard Business Review - Sep 11

We are drawn to those who echo what it is we already believe. We get a dopamine rush when we are presented with confirming data similar to what we get when we eat chocolate or fall in love. On Facebook we defriend those with different political views to our own . On Twitter we follow people just like us. Yet a vast body of research now points to the import of contemplating diverse, dissenting views. Not just in terms of making us more rounded individuals but in terms of making us smarter decision-makers. ...

Analyst Scrutiny Impedes Corporate Innovation

Harvard Business Review - Sep 11

Companies covered by larger numbers of analysts generate fewer patents, and the patents they produce have lower impact than those from other firms, according to an analysis by Jie (Jack) He of the University of Georgia and Xuan Tian of Indiana University. The findings suggest that analysts exert so much pressure on managers to meet short-term financial goals that they impede companies’ investment in long-term projects, the researchers say.

Nice or Tough: Which Approach Engages Employees Most?

Harvard Business Review - Sep 11

It’s probably no news to most people who work that poor leaders produce disgruntled, unengaged employees. Our research also shows convincingly that great leaders do the opposite — that is, that they produce highly committed, engaged, and productive employees. And the difference is cavernous — in a study of 160,576 employees working for 30,661 leaders at hundreds of companies around the world, we found average commitment scores in the bottom quarter for those unfortunate enough to work for ...

The Best of September 2013

Harvard Business Review - Sep 11

Managing Yourself Make Time for the Work That Matters Julian Birkinshaw and Jordan Cohen Julian Birkinshaw and Jordan Cohen How much time do you spend each day on the work that really matters? How much of the time are you doing something else — filling out expense reports, say, or going to meetings that don’t really require your presence? The knowledge workers the authors interviewed in 39 companies spent a jaw-dropping 41% of their time on those low-value pursuits. But when the authors led 15 ...

Don’t Lose Sight of Creativity’s Real Purpose

Harvard Business Review - Sep 10

Low light. Moderate levels of noise. Alcohol. These are all things that — according to research — enhance our creativity. Those findings are all interesting, no doubt, but the applications of such enhanced creativity in the real world are pretty debatable. By focusing too much on the smallest details, we often lose sight of why creativity is so important in the first place: because it improves people’s lives. That’s the whole point, and it’s something businesses should keep in ...

Managing a ‘seismic shift’

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 10

Harvard simultaneously faces stiff economic challenges and evolving opportunities, President Drew Faust said in her opening-of-year speech.

The media, remade

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 10

Three spring 2013 fellows at the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, in collaboration with the Nieman Journalism Lab, this week launched an oral history/research multimedia project called “Riptide” to document the digital disruption of the news business and what that means for the future of news gathering and news publishing.

Forks, knives, beakers

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 10

New York Times columnist Harold McGee and chef Dave Arnold introduced this year's “Science and Cooking” public lecture series, which runs through December.

Summer in the lab

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 10

Students from local high schools spent a chunk of the summer at work in a Harvard lab as part of program co-sponsored by the University’s Life Sciences Education program and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Grad students make impact

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 10

A sample of how Harvard graduate students from the Law School, Kennedy School, Business School, and the School of Public Health used the tools they sharpened at Harvard to help build a better world.

The Subtle Game of Audits

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Sep 10

In the Working Paper, “Audits as Signals,” Zeckhauser and his co-authors -- Maciej Kotowski, assistant professor of public policy; and David Weisbach at the University of Chicago Law School -- argue that this dynamic creates a game between organizations that are subject to audits and the bureaus that perform them.

Houghton’s heroes

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 10

Houghton Library, Harvard's home to literary and historical treasures, is more like a museum than your typical library.

You’ve Been Fired: Now What?

Harvard Business Review - Sep 10

You’ve just received word that you’ve been fired. Or perhaps the company has gone through a re-structuring and eliminated your job — and you’ve been told that none of the managers you’ve worked with over the years have a position for you on their team. This comes as a shock to your system, especially if you’ve enjoyed a record of success up to this point in your career. While there are some practical things to attend to — negotiating your severance, signing up ...

“The Future We Shape Is Up to Us”

Harvard Magazine - Sep 10

In an opening address inaugurating the new academic year, President Drew Faust encouraged the greater Harvard community to keep one eye on “unprecedented opportunities” that lie ahead—and the other on the fiscal realities of a still-weakened economy. “Harvard is about possibilities. Here, it is possible to change how our successors will think about learning and teaching,” Faust said, after being introduced in Sanders Theatre by Snider and Family professor of business administration Herman ...

Six artists, teaching and creating

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 10

Following tradition, Harvard’s Department of Visual and Environmental Studies is hosting visiting faculty, six artists this year. Talks have been scheduled through November. The opening reception is Sept. 12.

How Corporate Venture Capital Helps Firms Explore New Territory

Harvard Business Review - Sep 10

A good idea faces so many obstacles en route to market today that it’s a wonder we have any innovative products at all. You know those baby sea turtles that get eaten by birds and crabs on their way from the nest to the water? It’s like that. Corporations have narrowed the focus of their R&D by pressing for clear, short-term wins; venture capitalists are too quick to get caught up in the latest, hottest thing; and even the vaunted crowdfunding option is pretty limited: It’s great if ...

Why Is Innovation So Often Synonymous With Disappointment?

Harvard Business Review - Sep 10

Because a pure idea is a beautiful thing, and seeing it get mauled as it struggles to become something real can be highly disappointing. It’s painful to see your “bridge to the moon” end up as a mere woodshed . Welcome to HBR’s new Insight Center: Beyond the Breakthrough: Executing on Innovation . This four-week series addresses the reality problem that always besets great ideas, and our thesis in curating it is that reality isn’t a problem — or at least it doesn’t ...

First Look: September 10

HBS Working Knowledge - Sep 10

Advancing academia's understanding of HQ An effective central headquarters operation is essential to corporate success, many scholars agree, but just how HQ works to achieve such effectiveness is something of an understudied research topic. David J. Collis and colleagues attempt to remedy that understanding gap with a review of the fragmented literature, offering a framework for other scholars to build upon. "One of the most promising opportunities for future research refers to the urgent need to enhance ...

There’s only one Harvard

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 10

Philip Harding, who is an M.P.P. student at Harvard Kennedy School and president of the Harvard Graduate Council, shares his thoughts on the "Harvard experience."

It Takes Purpose to Become a Billionaire

Harvard Business Review - Sep 10

What do billionaires have in common? What is it that they do better than anyone else? Why do we admire them, or their companies’ products and services, so much? I’ve spent some time trying to identify common traits in the Forbes list of billionaires and other similar lists of the world’s wealthiest. I’m particularly interested in finding patterns in the types of people whom I respect. It’s less about all that dough they’ve accumulated than about better understanding how ...

Google Named Development Partner to edX

Harvard Magazine - Sep 10

edX , the nonprofit Harvard-MIT online learning partnership , today announced a partnership with Google to jointly develop edX's open-source software. The edX-Google partnership will, according to the news announcement, build and operate MOOC.org (the acronym for massive open online courses), through which institutions that are not members of the edX consortium—other universities and colleges, businesses, government, and nonprofit entities—and individuals (teachers and others) will be able to create ...

Weighing the Value of an Infantry Soldier's Life

Harvard Business Review - Sep 10

In substituting heavily armored combat vehicles at a cost of $170,000 each for lighter, $50,000 vehicles during the 2000s, the U.S. Army reduced infantry deaths by 0.04-0.43 per month at an estimated cost per life saved that is below the $7.5 million commonly accepted “value of a statistical life,” say Chris Rohlfs of Syracuse University and Ryan Sullivan of the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School. However, the Army’s subsequent replacement of about 9,000 of those new vehicles with even more ...

Apple's New iPhone 5C and 5S: the Results of Creativity or Innovation?

Harvard Business Review - Sep 10

Every idea, no matter how ingenious or successful, will eventually need to be replaced with a new one. But business leaders, as human beings above all, tend to cling to their existing ideas, beliefs, and other mental models — or what we call boxes — longer than they should. For instance, Henry Ford famously insisted on continuing to manufacture the Model T long after his competitors were creating dazzling new automobiles that significantly cannibalized sales of his once bestselling car. When ...

New name for Old Quincy

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 9

After 15 months of construction, the renewal of Old Quincy — the neo-Georgian portion of Quincy House — was completed Saturday when it was renamed Stone Hall in honor of Robert G. Stone Jr. ’45, the late senior fellow of the Harvard Corporation, during a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

Wynton Marsalis to continue lecture-performance series

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 9

Wynton Marsalis will continue his lecture series this month, featuring the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra at Sanders Theatre on Sept. 26.

So near, so far, at Harvard

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 9

Freshmen this year come from very close to Harvard Yard and from very far away.

Piecing together Egypt’s rupture

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 9

It was the Muslim Brotherhood’s success at the ballot box and the poor prospects for opposition candidates in future elections that were at the root of last summer’s military takeover in Egypt, a Harvard Kennedy School Middle East specialist said Sept. 5.

‘All the Way’ to A.R.T.

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 9

Award-winning director Bill Rauch ’84 has returned to Harvard to present the play “All the Way,” a powerful examination of President Lyndon B. Johnson, civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., and the critical events leading up to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1964. The show will open the American Repertory Theater’s season.

It Changed My Life: The Feminine Mystique at 50

Radcliffe Institute - Sep 9

Date and Time: Tuesday, October 01, 2013, 9:30 AM to Thursday, February 06, 2014, 5:00 PM Exhibits Schlesinger Library In February 1963, the journalist Betty Friedan published The Feminine Mystique , in which she described a malaise among American women: “The problem that has no name.” Narrowed expectations in American society, shaping women to be housewiv

HKS Alumnus Steers Apex Through Rough Times

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Sep 9

Preeti Sriratana MC/MPA 2012 took the helm of APEX in 2007 during a financial crisis and has steered it toward becoming one of the largest mentoring programs for Asian-Americans in New York City.

Six Principles for Developing Humility as a Leader

Harvard Business Review - Sep 9

Whether we're looking at business or politics, sports or entertainment, it's clear we live in an era of self-celebration. Fame is equated with success, and being self-referential has become the norm. As a result we are encouraged to pump ourselves full of alarming self-confidence. Bluster and the alpha instinct, contends Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic, professor of business psychology, often get mistaken for ability and effectiveness (at least for a while). It may well be why so many (incompetent) men rise ahead ...

DNA glue directs tiny gel ‘bricks’ to self-assemble

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 9

A team of researchers at the Wyss Institute has found a way to self-assemble complex structures out of gel “bricks” smaller than a grain of salt. The new method could help solve one of the major challenges in tissue engineering.

The Syria Saga, Explained

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Sep 9

Nicholas Burns sees a vexing puzzle, with tough challenges ahead.

Female Entrepreneurs Go Beyond "Cookies and Crafts"

Harvard Business Review - Sep 9

In the 1990's, if you asked most women business owners what their dreams were, they'd say they just want to be able to support themselves and their families. The times have changed. Today, women have bigger dreams and seek to grow their businesses to the maximum level. However, many are still saddled with an outdated perception about their roles in business and contributions to the economy, despite tremendous growth over the past decade. The old perception is that women-led and -owned businesses are ...

Teaching Climate Change to Skeptics

HBS Working Knowledge - Sep 9

A few years ago, Joseph B. Lassiter traveled to San Francisco, Houston, and New York to hold discussions with Harvard alumni on the topic of business and the environment. Each time, he surveyed the audience about the touchy subject of climate change and how society should react to it. And while his presentations had been essentially identical and the audiences at first blush quite similar, the attitudes he encountered were disparate. "In Northern California, 80 percent of the audience thought climate ...

The Disintermediation of Financial Markets: Direct Investing in Private Equity

HBS Working Knowledge - Sep 9

by Lily Fang, Victoria Ivashina, and Josh Lerner Executive Summary — As numerous news stories document, interest on the part of institutional investors in undertaking direct investments—and thus bypassing intermediaries—appears to have increased substantially. More generally, the impact of financial intermediation has also been a subject of considerable examination in the corporate finance literature. On the one hand, these middlemen should be able to overcome transaction cost and ...

Strategic Humor: Cartoons from the October 2013 Issue

Harvard Business Review - Sep 9

Enjoy these cartoons from the October issue of HBR, and test your management wit in the HBR Cartoon Caption Contest at the bottom of this post . If we choose your caption as the winner, you will be featured in next month's magazine and win a free Harvard Business Review Press book. "Watch yourself out there. This guy looks like he means business." Mick Stevens "We don't expect you to be married to your job, but the odd date might be nice." Susan Camilleri Konar "Hey, Frank, hold up. I stapled the wrong ...

A Discount May Devalue a Product More Than a Giveaway

Harvard Business Review - Sep 9

Consumers who were offered free bread sticks as a promotion from a pizzeria said they'd be willing to pay $5.06 , on average, for them once the promotion ended, only slightly less than the amount consumers were willing to pay when there had been no promotion, say Mauricio M. Palmeira of Monash University in Australia and Joydeep Srivastava of the University of Maryland. By contrast, people who were offered the bread sticks at a discounted price of 50 cents were willing to pay just $2.76 once the promotion ...

What's the Point of Creativity?

Harvard Business Review - Sep 9

Creativity and innovation are hot topics these days, and they are being studied more frequently and intensely. Great observations have come of the attention, as Will Burns writes for Forbes : A coffee-shop study from the University of Illinois concluded that moderate levels of noise, as opposed to high or low levels, foster greater creativity. A study from the University of Stuttgart found that low levels of lighting enhance creativity. And then there's my favorite, another study from the University of ...

Stone Hall Dedicated

Harvard Magazine - Sep 9

On a “momentous and historic day…for all of the Harvard Houses,” Quincy House master Lee Gehrke on September 7 welcomed students, staff and faculty members, top administrators, and donors to the formal dedication of Stone Hall: “Old Quincy” renovated, renamed—for the late Senior Fellow of the Harvard Corporation, Robert G. Stone Jr. ’45, L.H.D. ’03 —and symbolizing, its master declared, “the completion of the first step” in a full-scale renewal of the College’s undergraduate living ...

A Summers Miscellany

Bits and Pieces - Sep 8

The week has seen some good and some bad reasoning about why Summers should not be appointed Fed chair. I have blogged several times that the attacks on Summers as being anti-woman were a favor to him, distracting attention from his corruption and lack of self-control, not to mention his poor track record in crisis management. I cringed and the photo of the women in congress lined up to oppose him. So when I read Prof. Sue Goldie's piece in Politico , I rolled my eyes. I think it will be helpful to Summers ...

Harvard Dems Welcome Democratic MA-5 Candidates for Forum and Meet and Greet!

Harvard College Democrats - Sep 8

The Harvard Dems are proud to invite Harvard students, faculty and the general public to join us for a meet-and-greet and candidates forum with the Democratic candidates running for the nomination for the Fifth Congressional District, to fulfill the vacancy left by now-Senator Ed Markey! All are welcome, and every candidate will be in attendance. [...]

Guest Post by Justin Thaler: A "Mini-Survey" of Practical Verification Algorithms

My Biased Coin - Sep 6

Justin Thaler , after presenting his most recent work on verifiable computation at Crypto, decided to write up a mini-survey on recent work in the area, and he offered to make it a blog post. It's a somewhat longer-than-average blog post, but well worthwhile. So without further ado, here's Justin. ------ In the last few years there has been an enormous amount of work devoted to the development of "practical" protocols for verifiable computation, with multiple approaches being pursued across several ...

Berkman Buzz: September 7, 2013

Berkman Center - Newsfeed - Sep 6

The Berkman Buzz is selected weekly from the posts of Berkman Center people and projects . To subscribe, click here . The Berkman Center's annual Fall Open House will take place on September 9, 2013. Register here to meet our faculty, fellows, and staff and to learn about the many ways you can get involved in our dynamic, exciting environment! Bruce Schneier explains how to stay secure in the face of NSA surveillance Now that we have enough details about how the NSA eavesdrops on the internet, including ...

Destination space

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 6

Jessica Meir, an assistant professor of anesthesia at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, is the latest member of the Harvard community given a chance to head to space, joining moon-walkers and Hubble Space Telescope repairmen as she trains to become a NASA astronaut.

Cancer vaccine begins Phase I clinical trials

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 6

A cross-disciplinary team of Harvard scientists, engineers, and clinicians announced Sept. 6 that they have begun a Phase I clinical trial of an implantable vaccine to treat melanoma, the most lethal form of skin cancer.

One Chair at a Time

HBS Bulletin - Sep 6

One Chair at a Time by Constantine von Hoffman Beth Stewart Photo by Benoit Cortet Corporate America's glass ceiling doesn't stop at the C-suite. Only 16.6 percent of Fortune 500 companies have a woman on their board of directors. Beth A. Stewart (MBA 1982) is uniquely qualified to change that. And she is changing it—one board at a time. Stewart, currently on the boards of Carmax, Inc., and Avatar Holdings, was first named a director when she was 36. In the 20 years since then, she estimates she has ...

What See-Through Pants Can Reveal About a Company's Weaknesses

Harvard Business Review - Sep 6

Downward Dog, Perhaps Lululemon, the upscale retailer of yoga clothing, is doing great . Except when it's not, which is becoming increasingly common — see the sheer pants crisis , the abrupt resignation of a CEO , a poorly-received job ad to replace said CEO, and a bit of media heat over a 2011 murder that occurred in a Bethesda store. And there's no denying that Lululemon founder Dennis "Chip" Wilson figured out something stupidly revolutionary early on: Women's exercise clothes should be made to ...

Don't Let Your Career "Just Happen"

Harvard Business Review - Sep 6

We all know The Statistic: Only 4.2 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs are women . But the gender split in mid-level management is now nearly even . While women have made progress in being recognized as managers, why aren't they making it to the top? In many cases, they've climbed to the last rung of a ladder that simply doesn't go all the way up, like a business function (HR, perhaps) that isn't generally tapped for the CEO position. In others, they lack the critical experiences or skills required to take the ...

Customer Intimacy, Meet Operational Excellence

Harvard Business Review - Sep 6

What is more important to company success, a strong external focus on customer experiences or an internal focus on effective and efficient operations? Of course, it's a false dichotomy — you need both. I described in an earlier post how Tesco worked for years to improve its supply chain capabilities, then leveraged this value by using deeper customer knowledge to enrich customer experiences. But let's flip the paradigm. Some organizations which have competed successfully for decades by focusing ...

A Striking Labor Market Fact

Greg Mankiw's Blog - Sep 6

John Lott points out the following: "So far this year there have been 848,000 new jobs. Of those, 813,000 are part time jobs.... To put it differently, an incredible 96% of the jobs added this year were part-time jobs." Update : Here is the CEA take on this general topic. And this is from the San Francisco Fed. I found the following chart of interest. Part-time employment as a shareof total employmentfor selected groups This shows that part-time work isnotably higherthan it has been historically ...

Seven Types of Sales Managers

Harvard Business Review - Sep 6

Over the past decade, I've worked closely with hundreds of vice presidents of sales, and like all of people, each has a unique personality. Some are gregarious. Some are assertive. Some are action-oriented. But even as I observe their individual differences, I have recognized patterns of behavior, which have allowed me to catalog their styles of sales management. I have found that seven management styles are most prevalent: mentor, expressive, sergeant, Teflon, micromanager, overconfident and amateur. Most ...

Don't Tell a Suffering Coworker "It Could Have Been Worse"

Harvard Business Review - Sep 6

After being subjected to the upsetting experience of receiving negative feedback on a task, research participants felt particularly badly, scoring an average of 4 on a 7-point positive-affect scale, if they were indirectly told that getting a low score on a task was a "not serious" event. By contrast, those who could decide for themselves on the seriousness of such an event felt less bad ( 4.63 ), even though they too tended to classify the experience as "not serious." The research, by a team led by ...

Our Self-Inflicted Complexity

Harvard Business Review - Sep 6

People who make it their business to study large-scale problems (business theorists and economists among them) seem to be in broad agreement that the world is growing ever more complex — and that this trend makes their work harder. If this is true, then we should be grateful for their ongoing efforts and to a large extent let them off the hook for failing to make more progress. But is it true? The claim can be hard to evaluate given the number of meanings that attach to the word complexity. But if we ...

The Syria saga, explained

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 5

The Kennedy School’s Nicholas Burns, a former U.S. diplomat, discusses the crisis in Syria and where it is likely to lead.

The little old machine that could

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 5

In the high-tech laboratory at the Arnold Arboretum’s Weld Hill Research Building, amid an array of expensive, shiny new equipment, sits a 1931 microtome, a machine whose well-oiled parts keep cranking out slices of tissue just 10 micrometers wide, thin enough for light to penetrate and perfect for making slides to see the internal cellular structure of plants.

New Faculty Feature: Lecturer in Public Policy Janina Matuszeski

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Sep 5

We asked those joining us this year a few questions – about their research, their teaching and other interests.

The Turn in Online Education

Harvard Magazine - Sep 5

During the summer break on campuses nationwide, providers of massive open online courses (MOOCs) were evidently hard at work developing their fall-term offerings and broadening their capabilities—and were the subject of still more comment and analysis as technology influences higher education. Some highlights appear here. HarvardX Enrollments and Aims HarvardX reported that combined enrollments in all 17 University courses offered through the edX venture with MIT exceeded 500,000 as of mid August , with ...

Ambitious Women Face More Obstacles than Just Work-Life Balance

Harvard Business Review - Sep 5

For the past year and change, the American conversation about women and leadership has revolved around challenges of work-life balance — which most of the time actually means "work-family balance." The women we're hearing from — Anne-Marie Slaughter , Sheryl Sandberg , and the rest — aren't jetting out of the office at 5:30 to train for a marathon or learn Chinese or even just binge-watch Law and Order: Special Victims Unit . They're leaving "early" to take care of their children. And so ...

The Smartest Clothes of All: The Wily Cuttlefish

Radcliffe Institute - Sep 5

Date and Time: Tuesday, September 17, 2013, 5:00 PM Lectures Sheerr Room, Fay House  

Six Classes Your Employer Wishes You Could Take

Harvard Business Review - Sep 5

School is back amid growing controversy and cynicism. The quality, validity and economic value of college degrees and MBAs have rarely been under such sustained assault. Employability of graduates has never been so dismal. Machines are clearly getting smarter at many of the things people traditionally do on the job. That means people need to become non-traditionally smarter at things machines are not quite yet ready to think about or do. And that means educators worldwide must revisit how they want to make ...

Why We Need More (Women) Leaders

Harvard Business Review - Sep 5

There's been a lot of talk this past year about why more women don't become leaders. About what our society needs to change to produce more female leaders. There's even been some discussion about why women are better leaders than men in some arenas. Often overlooked is this basic reality: what the world needs is more leaders, of whatever gender or any other characteristic. We need more leaders at every level in every kind of organization — businesses, government, schools, neighborhood and ...

How CEOs Are Succeeding in Africa

Harvard Business Review - Sep 5

Jonathan Berman , author of Success in Africa , busts media myths about the continent. Download this podcast A written transcript will be available by September 13.

For big questions, a bigger forum

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 5

Coordinated through the Freshman Dean’s Office, the "Reflecting on Your Life" initiative, which invites freshmen to think about meaning and purpose, has received a grant from the Teagle Foundation to broaden the scope of the program.

Make Your Knowledge Workers More Productive

Harvard Business Review - Sep 5

With scarcely any help from management, knowledge workers can increase their productivity by 20%. When we interviewed 45 such people across 39 companies in 8 industries in the United States and Europe, we found that by identifying low-value tasks to either drop completely, delegate to someone else or outsource, the average worker gained back roughly one day a week they could use for more important tasks. (We detail this process in our HBR article, " Make Time for the Work That Matters .") If that's what ...

Performance Responses to Competition Across Skill-Levels in Rank Order Tournaments: Field Evidence and Implications for Tournament Design

HBS Working Knowledge - Sep 5

by Kevin J. Boudreau, Constance E. Helfat, Karim R. Lakhani, and Michael E. Menietti. Executive Summary — Tournaments and other rank-order incentive mechanisms have been used to model a wide range of settings: executive placement, elections, research and development and innovation contests, sports tournaments, and variable sales compensation: situations in which placing at the top of the performance rank-order leads to out-sized payoffs. This article analyzes how the level of competition and size of ...

Should Higher Education Be Free?

Harvard Business Review - Sep 5

In the United States, our higher education system is broken. Since 1980, we've seen a 400% increase in the cost of higher education, after adjustment for inflation — a higher cost escalation than any other industry, even health care. We have recently passed the trillion dollar mark in student loan debt in the United States. How long can a business model succeed that forces students to accumulate $200,000 or more in debt and cannot guarantee jobs — even years after graduation? We need ...

Money's Other Purpose: Easing Our Fear of Death

Harvard Business Review - Sep 5

In an experiment, people who had been counting money indicated a lower fear of death than people who had been counting slips of white paper -- about 5.3 versus 6.5 on a zero-to-12 scale, says a team led by Tomasz Zaleskiewicz of the University of Social Sciences and Humanities in Warsaw. Moreover, people's estimates of the sizes of coins were an average of 34% larger if they had been primed to think about mortality, presumably because thoughts of death intensify the subjective value attributed to money. ...

Better Data Can Help Advertisers Avoid Cringe-Inducing Ad Placement

Harvard Business Review - Sep 5

You're watching TV with the family and having a nice moment. Then all of a sudden a commercial comes on for an erectile dysfunction drug, or a preview for a horror flick. You interrupt your blissful reverie with a reflex reaction, knocking over the chip bowl in a mad dash to change the channel. And now you have to explain both the commercial and your crazed reaction to your children. Fun times with the family indeed. Parents too often find themselves caught off guard during commercial breaks by advertising ...

How it all adds up: Accounting 'boot camp' is added to a growing roster of law and business courses at HLS

HLS News - Sep 5

A new intensive "boot camp" on accounting and finance is just one on Harvard Law School's growing roster of law and business courses, which now includes classes in business strategy, corporate finance and how to lead law firms. These courses ensure that students headed to law firms can speak a "common language" with their clients and understand the business environment in which both operate.

Lisa Rohrer appointed executive director of HLS Executive Education; will also oversee the Case Development Initiative

HLS News - Sep 5

Lisa Rohrer has been appointed as the new executive director of Executive Education and the Case Development Initiative at Harvard Law School.

Hub away from home

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 4

Established in 2006, the São Paulo, Brazil, office of the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies acts as a facilitator, connecting Harvard faculty and students with Brazilian collaborators.

Study shows female physicians paid less

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 4

A Harvard study provided strong evidence that female physicians are underpaid compared to their male counterparts.

Lasering in on tumors

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 4

In the battle against brain cancer, doctors now have a new weapon: an imaging technology that will make brain surgery dramatically more accurate by allowing surgeons to distinguish between brain tissue and tumors, and at a microscopic level.

Smart Clothes

Radcliffe Institute - Sep 4

Date and Time: Friday, November 15, 2013, 9:00 AM Conferences & Symposia Knafel Center (formerly Radcliffe Gymnasium) Radcliffe’s annual science symposium will focus on “smart clothes” and the science of designing materials that improve and protect lives.

Legacies of leadership

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 4

PBHA summer campers rise through the ranks to take leadership positions and start to give back to their communities.

Take Three

HBS Bulletin - Sep 4

Take Three by Julia Hanna Henry McGee Photo courtesy of HBO When he graduated from HBS, Henry McGee (MBA 1979), a former Newsweek reporter, was pretty sure he wanted to get into the business side of media. Time Inc. offered him two jobs. One would put him on the established path of magazine publisher. The other was at the media company's relatively unknown cable TV subsidiary, Home Box Office. He took the job at HBO and stayed for 34 years, recently retiring as president of HBO Home Entertainment, the ...

Women's Business Leader

HBS Bulletin - Sep 4

Carla Harris Photo courtesy of Carla Harris On August 12, President Obama announced his intention to appoint Carla Harris (MBA 1987) to be the Chair of the National Women's Business Council (NWBC). Harris is a prominent global investment professional and business expert. She currently serves as the Vice Chairman of Wealth Management and Senior Client Advisor at Morgan Stanley where she is responsible for increasing revenue generation and client connectivity and penetration across the Wealth Management, ...

Staffer wins Hollywood Book Festival grand prize

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 4

Jonathan Womack, a media technician at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, took home the grand prize at the Hollywood Book Festival for his sci-fi novel “A Cry for a Hero.”

Japan cultural agency honors Bestor

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 4

Theodore C. Bestor, the Reischauer Institute Professor of Social Anthropology and director of the Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, has received the Commissioner of Cultural Affairs Award for the Promotion of Japanese Culture from the Agency for Cultural Affairs in Japan.

Research: To Reduce E-mail, Get Execs to Send Fewer Messages

Harvard Business Review - Sep 4

You can ease an organization's overall e-mail burden by teaching top executives to send fewer, and clearer, e-mails, a team from consulting and academia has discovered. In a study at the headquarters of a large company, the team found that each executive e-mail begets a time-wasting flurry of other messages, especially if the original is confusing or ambiguous. To see how dramatic the potential time savings can be, take a look at this interactive: The figures in the exhibit assume that each staff member ...

Let Your Customers Streamline Your Business

Harvard Business Review - Sep 4

This post was coauthored by Lisa Bodell. Customers appreciate simplicity. In fact, a number of recent studies have shown that it's key to their loyalty and satisfaction. CEB reported in HBR last year that the most important factor in creating customer "stickiness" was "decision simplicity," i.e. the ease of getting credible information in the midst of marketing noise. Another CEB study found that loyalty is positively affected by reducing the amount of effort that customers need to invest in service ...

The More Things Change, the More Our Objections to Change Stay the Same

Harvard Business Review - Sep 4

One of the very first articles in the very first issue of Fast Company , a magazine I started 20 years ago with Alan Webber, is a smart and entertaining list compiled by E.F. Borisch, product manager at a long-established outfit called Milwaukee Gear Company. Borisch's article was titled, " 50 Reasons Why We Cannot Change ," and it offered a clever and entertaining collection of objections to and worries about the hard work of making real progress. Reason #1: "We've never done it before." Reason #4: "We ...

Berkman Center Open House (9/9); Is beautiful really usable? (9/17); DPLAFest Registration Now Open

Berkman Center - Newsfeed - Sep 4

Berkman Events Newsletter Template Upcoming Events / Digital Media September 4, 2013 The Digital Problem Solving Initiative (DPSI) is a Harvard-wide pilot program that aims to bring together students, faculty, university officials, fellows, and staff to work in teams on practicable and concrete digital problems and opportunities. Apply here to be a Berkman DPSI Pioneer. special event Berkman Center Fall 2013 Open House Monday, September 9 , starting at 4pm ET, Harvard Law School, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein ...

Zines were the scene

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 4

Two Harvard undergrad spent the summer at Widener Library working with a newly acquired collection of zines, the self-published, self-distributed counterculture voices of the 1980s and early ’90s.

Your Nice Boss May Be Killing Your Career

Harvard Business Review - Sep 4

Chris spent years working for a supportive, encouraging manager at a major technology company headquartered in Silicon Valley. In fact, his boss raved about him. His manager gave him top ratings in his performance evaluations, space to do his work, and had never been controlling. He was, according to Chris, terribly, unswervingly nice. Picture perfect boss, right? Wrong. His manager had been in the company for 20 years. He had learned how to survive in the bureaucracy: don't make too many waves, don't ...

How Relevant is Long-Range Strategic Planning?

HBS Working Knowledge - Sep 4

From time to time thinking converges around a set of ideas. For us this month, the topic is strategy planning and organization. Conventional thinking and organization that has encouraged us to seek sustainable competitive advantage in the past is being questioned in today's business environment. Some are even suggesting that the mind set that has given us strategic planning concepts such as SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) analysis, the "five forces," growth share matrices, five-year ...

How Industry Giants Can Create Corporate Breakthroughs

Harvard Business Review - Sep 4

Most large corporations will admit to struggling with innovation. But in reality most companies, particularly those that manage to last for any reasonable period of time, do day-to-day innovation extremely well. After all, your laptop (if you still use one) is much more reliable than it was a decade ago. Your television picture quality is significantly better. Your cellphone sounds clearer and drops fewer calls. Your shampoo leaves your hair feeling cleaner. Your toothpaste leaves your mouth feeling that ...

New Study Identifies Clear Gender Gap in Physicians’ Earnings

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Sep 4

New research by Amitabh Chandra shows a discernible gender gap exists in earnings by physicians working across a range of occupations in the United States.

Confronted with Attractive Female Opponents, Male Chess Players Take Greater Risks

Harvard Business Review - Sep 4

For every 1-standard-deviation increase in a female opponent's attractiveness, male participants in large international chess competitions have an 8% greater propensity to play risky openings, but these moves aren't beneficial for their game performance, says a team led by Anna Dreber of Stockholm School of Economics in Sweden. Female players, by contrast, don't appear to be affected by the attractiveness of their male partners. Although there's no payoff on the chess board, "it could turn out that playing ...

The Global Rise of Female Entrepreneurs

Harvard Business Review - Sep 4

Women's entrepreneurship has hit a media tipping point. The question is: Is it just a passing media fad that will soon be a blip on the radar screen, or is it actually a real, fundamental economic force that's reshaping the world? I think it's safe to say that it's the latter. Women-owned entities in the formal sector represent approximately 37% of enterprises globally — a market worthy of attention by businesses and policy makers alike. While aggregated data is often challenging to find, the recent ...

The Charade of Liberal Arts Campuses in Authoritarian States

Bits and Pieces - Sep 3

Jim Sleeper has two terrific pieces on universities selling their souls to authoritarian states. I touched on this in my piece in the South China Morning Post , but Sleeper dives much deeper into the issues, and puts the argument squarely on first principles. Happily, on this one I can be a disinterested observer. I am quite proud that Harvard has resisted the temptation (it surely must have gotten a pitch or two) to set up Harvard College East, and has instead contented itself with opening research ...

Biases that can blind us

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 3

Psychology Professor Mahzarin Banaji gave incoming members of Harvard’s Class of 2017 a tour of their own biases, helping to raise awareness that can help them avoid making decisions based on unconscious preferences.

The Dean Discloses His “D”

Harvard Magazine - Sep 3

On Labor Day afternoon, some 1,600 freshmen, gathered from 49 states and 65 countries into Sanders Theatre and Memorial Church, learned that recently appointed interim dean of Harvard College Donald Pfister—“Like you, I’ve just moved in, and like you, I will be moving out of the Yard when classes end”—had barely mustered a D in German in his first undergraduate semester at Miami University (Ohio). A small-town kid, he and his sister were the first in their family to go to college. Photograph ...

Remembering Ronald Coase

Harvard Business Review - Sep 3

Yesterday, I texted a non-economist friend to say how sad I was to learn of the death of Ronald H. Coase, who won the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1991. She wrote back, "Was it sudden or unexpected?" Well, I answered, he was 102 years old. So no. Not unexpected. As for sudden, it did feel so to me. I haven't actually seen Prof. Coase since I moved from Chicago ten years ago. But I've just finished work on a new book with Paul Nunes on the new age of disruptive innovation (based on our March 2013 HBR ...

‘Let us begin again’

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 3

Harvard President Drew Faust opened the first day of fall classes Tuesday by welcoming students and faculty to a new academic year during the traditional Morning Prayers.

Goodbye tourists, hello residents

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 3

As the Class of 2017 settled in at Harvard and began Freshman Week, students from around the world were busy taking in the unfamiliar sights and sounds of their tightly packed, red-brick neighborhood, their home base for the next four years.

Case Study: Bet on One Big Idea or Diversify?

Harvard Business Review - Sep 3

The latest clinical trial of the experimental therapy L-39, conducted in India, was finally complete — and the results were thoroughly underwhelming. Hilde Dach, the former chief scientist at drug-development start-up Genbac and now a team leader at German pharmaceuticals maker Caliska, which had acquired Genbac, could read disappointment in the face of Johan Greve, the Caliska division head who was her boss. The journey ahead for the drug, developed through Hilde's research on probiotics, suddenly ...

Meet MC/MPA Mason Fellow Miguel Santos

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Sep 3

This year, several MC/MPA students have volunteered to introduce themselves through the Harvard Kennedy School School admissions blog with a self-authored post.

Do Your Kids Need More Competitive Capital?

Harvard Business Review - Sep 3

"When I was interviewing [job candidates] at Morgan Stanley, if I got a female candidate — because it's banking and you need to be aggressive, you need to be tough — if she played, like, ice hockey, done. My daughter's playing, and I'm just a big believer in kids learning to be confidently aggressive, and I think that plays out in life assertiveness." I met Madeline while studying 95 families with elementary school-age children who compete in chess, dance, and soccer — research that is ...

“Let Us Begin Again”

Harvard Magazine - Sep 3

Updated September 3, 2013, at 5:10 p.m. This dispatch has been retitled; due to a recording error, the president’s phrase “Let us begin again” wasoriginally reported as using the word “anew” instead. The quote is also corrected below, and a link has been posted to the transcript of her remarks, which was not available earlier. Beginning the seventh academic year of her tenure in Massachusetts Hall, President Drew Faust spoke at morning prayers in Memorial Church, as is now ...

Four Areas Where Senior Leaders Should Focus Their Attention

Harvard Business Review - Sep 3

It was getting close to lunch time and the people seated around the table — the CEO and seven of his direct reports — were clearly getting antsy. But it wasn't because they were hungry. In fact, they'd been eating snacks all morning, mostly out of boredom. The COO was at the front of the room, talking through slides projected on a screen. The conversation was primarily one way, with the COO explaining and, when necessary, defending his work. Finally, when we broke for lunch, the CEO took me ...

The Most Important Negotiation in Your Life

Harvard Business Review - Sep 3

Life is a series of negotiations. You negotiate all day, every day, from the time you wake up to the time you go to sleep. Contract terms and conditions. Hiring, managing performance, and firing. Defining deadlines, scope, and deliverables. Collecting fees. Seeking alignment about business strategy. Enlisting stakeholders. Creating partnerships and joint ventures. Dissolving them. You make offers, counteroffers, and agreements to settle. You say yes. You say no. You stall for time. Finally, lunch. When you ...

There Is Such a Thing as Too Much Incentive for Entrepreneurs

Harvard Business Review - Sep 3

Many entrepreneurs have their entire net worth tied up in their companies. For a long time, this is exactly what most venture investors wanted: more to gain (and lose) means a stronger incentive, greater focus, and better performance - right? No. In many cases this lack of diversification is overkill and actually hampers performance. First, a lack of diversification exacerbates the fundamental difference in economic incentive between entrepreneur and investor: when all your money is tied up in a startup, ...

How the Zebra Got Its Stripes: Imprinting of Individuals and Hybrid Social Ventures

HBS Working Knowledge - Sep 3

by Matthew Lee and Julie Battilana Executive Summary — Creating hybrid organizations that combine existing organizational forms is a complex process. Given the legitimacy challenges facing hybrid organizations, why are they created in the first place? The authors focus on the role of "environmental imprinting" on individuals: this means the persistent effects that individuals' environments during sensitive periods have on their subsequent behaviors. After constructing and analyzing a novel dataset of ...

Ronald Coase has died

Greg Mankiw's Blog - Sep 3

Here is the news from the University of Chicago .

Turn Talent Data Into Real Information

Harvard Business Review - Sep 3

Big data is all the rage in HR recently. But more immediately promising is the talk of small data — of more effectively managing the data we already have before we start thinking about analyzing more complex datasets. And nowhere is this more pertinent than with talent assessment data. For here, sitting right under organisations' noses, is a huge, easy, and yet almost always overlooked opportunity to fundamentally improve the way companies select and develop their talent. Every year, companies spend ...

Are You Among the "Effort Averse"?

Harvard Business Review - Sep 3

Results of an experiment suggest that more than one-fifth of participants preferred the boring but easy task of watching visitors in an art gallery to the more engaging but demanding tasks of escorting performers and cleaning up at a cultural festival, even though they had predicted that they would enjoy the engaging tasks more. These participants' willingness to accept lower wages to work at the gallery job reveals a phenomenon the researchers, David A. Comerford and Peter Ubel of Duke University, call ...

You're Probably Wrong About Millennials

Harvard Business Review - Sep 3

Managers routinely complain about their Gen Y employees as entitled, disloyal, and lazy — and as a result, conflicts arise. In a study in partnership with American Express for my new book , we found that while managers have a negative view of Gen Y, employees from this generation generally have a positive view of their managers. Employees feel that their managers have experience (59%), wisdom (41%) and are willing to mentor them (33%). On the other hand, managers feel that Gen Y employees have ...

Marginal Tax Rates under Obamacare

Greg Mankiw's Blog - Sep 3

Back in 2009, I pointed out in a NY Times column thatPresident Obama'shealthcare reform would involve substantial increases in implicit marginal tax rates. I am delighted thatCasey Mulligan is now giving the issue some serious attention in twonew NBER working papers( here and here ).He reports: This paper calculates the ACA’s impact on the average reward to working among nonelderly household heads and spouses. The law increases marginal tax rates by an average of five percentage points (of ...

HLS faculty weigh in on the week's legal news

HLS News - Sep 3

In a week of many developments in the world of law, Harvard Law School faculty were online, in print, and on the air offering analyses and opinions.

Email Privacy Redux

Bits and Pieces - Sep 2

It has been a quiet summer on the Harvard email privacy front, even as we have been inundated with Snowden revelations about the extent of surveillance of electronic communications by the US Government. Today's report in the New York Times that the Drug Enforcement Agency has even more telephone metadata at its disposal than the NSA does, and that it has AT&T employees under contract to answer subpoenas, only heightens the sense that if there is any way for the government to do any kind of surveillance ...

David Warsh Nails It

Bits and Pieces - Sep 2

There will probably not be many more chances to blog about Larry Summers and the Fed, since Obama's decision is probably near. On the other hand he has a few other things on his plate over the next week or two, so maybe he can keep the Fed appointment up in the air awhile longer. David Warsh's column today ends with a point that explains my exasperation over the possibility (nay, the likelihood) that Summers will be appointed to the Fed. After all, I am in no position to comment on monetary policy, or even ...

Welcoming the Class of ’17

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 2

At the annual Freshman Convocation Monday, Harvard President Drew Faust and other University officials told the Class of ’17 to embrace challenges, reach out to fellow students and others, and keep open minds about what the future should hold.

Don't 'Fight for Fifteen'

Greg Mankiw's Blog - Sep 2

U Chicago's Allen Sanderson opines on the minimum wage . Addendum : And here is an interesting new contribution to the empirical literature on minimum wages .

Should MBAs Learn to Code?

Harvard Business Review - Sep 2

This post was originally published on the author's blog . It has been edited slightly. "Should I learn to code?" MBAs who lack programming skills often ask this question when they pursue careers in technology companies. Bloggers like Yipit co-founder Vin Vacanti have shared views on the payoff from learning to code, as have several students at Harvard Business School, including Dana Hork , Matt Boys , and Matt Thurmond . I thought it'd be helpful to supplement bloggers' perspectives with some survey data. ...

Why Emerging Markets Don't Need Elon Musk

Harvard Business Review - Sep 2

Elon Musk, the South Africa-born entrepreneur, recently unveiled his proposals for the Hyperloop , a groundbreaking high-speed transportation system. The technology community has become accustomed to Musk pushing the boundaries. His name is also attached to Paypal, SpaceX, Tesla and Solar City, and he is very rightly celebrated. At the same time, South Africa is currently considering its own transport future and many African countries are much farther behind in transport infrastructure. The gap between ...

Pinched minds

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 2

The accumulation of money woes and day-to-day anxiety leaves many low-income individuals not only struggling financially, but cognitively, says Harvard economist Sendhil Mullainathan. In a study featured in Science, he reports that the “cognitive deficit” caused by poverty translates into as many as 10 IQ points.

The Curse of Double-Digit Growth

HBS Working Knowledge - Sep 2

Double-digit long-term growth might justify bragging rights for any country. But a turbocharged GDP comes at a price, says Eric D. Werker, an associate professor in the Business, Government and International Economy unit at Harvard Business School. "Countries that attained double-digit growth are not unequivocally a club that one should strive to join," writes Werker in his April 2013 working paper, Learning from Double-Digit Growth Experiences , published by the International Growth Centre at the London ...

Why Giving People an Option to Be Charitable May Hurt Your Business

Harvard Business Review - Sep 2

After a store chain introduced new recycling machines that allowed consumers to donate their returned bottle-and-can deposits to charity, people started avoiding the machines, says a team led by Mikael Knutsson of the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. Whereas the amount of deposits returned by the old machines had been up to 3,026 Swedish krona higher per month than in the previous year, indicating a rising level of recycling, the amount returned by the new machines was up to 12,303 krona lower per month ...

Please Stop Complaining About How Busy You Are

Harvard Business Review - Sep 2

We're all just so "busy" these days. "Slammed" in fact. "Buried." Desperately "trying to keep our heads above water." While these common responses to "How are you?" seem like they're lifted from the Worst Case Scenario Handbook , there seems to be a constant exchange, even a a one-upping, of just how much we have on our plates when we communicate about our work. My favorite "busy" humble-brag was that of a potential client who apologized for lack of communication due to a "week-long fire drill." What does ...

How Should History Affect Funding Decisions?

My Biased Coin - Sep 1

As I go through the reviews from my latest NSF proposal, there are general high-level comments related to my past work. This leads to an interesting and perhaps-not-often-enough discussed issue -- how should the past influence present funding decisions? Mikkel Thorup recently tried to open up discussion on this theme with a viewpoint piece in the Communications of the ACM . (Sorry it's behind a firewall; if someone has a direct link please post in comments.) To be clear, I'm not sure what the current ...

HUPD releases annual security report

Harvard Gazette Online - Sep 1

The Harvard University Police Department has released its annual report on crime, prevention, substance abuse, and other on-campus services.

My Climate Action Plan

Greg Mankiw's Blog - Aug 31

Click here to read my column in Sunday's NY Times .

Deep devotion, explored

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 30

Harvard Divinity School’s annual convocation included an address by Houghton Professor of the Practice of Ministry Studies Stephanie Paulsell, who explored the theme of devotion in the texts of the Bible’s “Song of Songs,” and in the work of author Virginia Woolf.

Research: Underdog Businesses Are More Likely to Post Fake Yelp Reviews

Harvard Business Review - Aug 30

The rise of online review platforms like Yelp has empowered consumers by reducing the informational asymmetry surrounding unfamiliar products and services. But some businesses face strong incentives to post fake reviews, which compromises the trustworthiness of such review sites. How prevalent are such fake reviews, and what firms are mostly likely to post them? New research reveals that independent businesses, those without many existing reviews on Yelp, and those that face intense competition are more ...

Berkman Buzz: August 30, 2013

Berkman Center - Newsfeed - Aug 30

The Berkman Buzz is selected weekly from the posts of Berkman Center people and projects . To subscribe, click here . The Berkman Center's annual Fall Open House will take place on September 9, 2013. Register here to meet our faculty, fellows, and staff and to learn about the many ways you can get involved in our dynamic, exciting environment! The Digital Problem Solving Initiative (DPSI) is a Harvard-wide pilot program that aims to bring together students, faculty, university officials, fellows, and staff ...

Updated Quincy a happy home

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 30

After 15 months of construction and renovation, Old Quincy, the first test project in the House Renewal initiative, began welcoming students this week.

When Work Is Challenging, Economies Thrive

Harvard Business Review - Aug 30

"In economics, consumption is the sole end of production," the late, great Swedish economist, politician, and social commentator Gunnar Myrdal wrote in 1930 . "This is a stock phrase of all the textbooks since Adam Smith: Man works in order to live." Myrdal, though, didn't think that was right: [T]here are many people who live in order to work, who consume in order to produce, if we like to use those terms. Most people who are reasonably well off derive more satisfaction in their capacity as producers than ...

David S. Landes, 89, dies

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 30

David S. Landes, a renowned historian whose work focused on the complex interplay of cultural mores and historical circumstance, died Aug. 17 at age 89.

Has Maximizing Shareholder Value Gone Too Far?

Harvard Business Review - Aug 30

By the People, Not for the People In 1963, IBM CEO Thomas J. Watson published A Business and Its Beliefs: The Ideas That Helped Build IBM . The text listed the company's values in the following order: respect for the employee; a commitment to customer service; and achieving excellence. By 1994, when Louis V. Gerstner Jr. headed the company, he orchestrated an epic turnaround, putting shareholder value and customer satisfaction at the top of the list. Employees and community were at the bottom. The most ...

Seamus Heaney Dies

Harvard Magazine - Aug 30

Seamus Heaney, the Irish poet who honored Harvard’s 350th anniversary celebration with “Villanelle for an Anniversary” and spoke movingly at its Commencement in 2000 of the responsibilities of those within its wallsto extend the boundaries of free inquiry, died earlier today in Dublin, The New York Times reported this morning. The Nobel laureate in literature in 1995 and Boylston professor of rhetoric and oratory emeritus was 74. A brief history of his many ties to Harvard is now available in ...

Heaney’s death caught ‘the heart off guard’

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 30

Irish poet Seamus Heaney, the 1995 Nobel laureate in literature with longtime ties to Harvard, died Aug. 30 in Ireland at age 74.

Will the Internet Destroy the Stock Market?

Harvard Business Review - Aug 30

Last week, the NASDAQ exchange froze for three hours due to a faulty connection . On Monday, Europe's largest derivatives market shut down for an hour because of a glitch. Last month, 14,000 people in rural Iowa lost internet access after a minor car crash crushed a cable . In 2011, the entire country of Egypt had a total internet blackout after officials ordered the country's ISPs to flip a few switches; the Syrian government is now doing the same. In late 2006, most of Asia had the same experience after ...

Meet MC/MPA 2014 Student Kota Yasumura

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Aug 30

This year, several MC/MPA students have volunteered to introduce themselves through the Harvard Kennedy School School admissions blog with a self-authored post.

Meet MC/MPA 2014 Student Kota Yasumura

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Aug 30

This year, several MC/MPA students have volunteered to introduce themselves through the Harvard Kennedy School School admissions blog with a self-authored post.

A Class Act

Greg Mankiw's Blog - Aug 30

A profile of Stanley Fischer .

Good News from the Marketplace

Greg Mankiw's Blog - Aug 30

It is the beginning ofa new academic year, and I am pleased to report that my favorite textbooks are still selling well .

Don't Let Them Underestimate You

Harvard Business Review - Aug 30

We all hope our resume and experiences will speak for themselves. But a friend of mine — a 40 year-old former special agent and combat veteran — recently emailed me about a persistent problem. "When I contact leaders in my industry, they almost always agree to talk," he told me. "But some have been treating me as if I were an undergrad." One asked if he was working on a "class project," while another suggested he "thank his parents" for sending him to graduate school (he paid his own way). ...

Sunlight Makes You More Willing to Take Risks

Harvard Business Review - Aug 30

A study at an outdoor parking lot in Singapore shows that the sunnier the weather, the more severe are drivers' parking violations, and an analysis of 40 years of Major League Baseball data reveals that stolen-base attempts are more likely during day games than night games, says a team led by Nicholas Reinholtz of Columbia University. Humans' tendency to take greater risks while the sun is shining may have evolved as an adaptive behavior, the researchers say.

How the garden grows

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 30

Thanks to an abundant garden, the Harvard Faculty Club is saving money and producing even better-tasting food.

Berkman Center’s Zittrain sees lessons in computer assaults on media

HLS News - Aug 30

Computer network hackers calling themselves the Syrian Electronic Army earlier this week disrupted The New York Times’ website for nearly a day and electronic publishing on the Twitter social network for several hours. Also targeted were the Huffington Post and other media outlets. To better understand the attacks, Harvard Gazette staff writer Christina Pazzanese asked Harvard Law School Professor Jonathan L. Zittrain to comment by email on what happened and how institutions will have to react in order ...

(End of) Summers Updates

Bits and Pieces - Aug 29

Bloomberg has a piece this morning about the debt swap fiasco at Harvard, and what it says about Larry Summers's tolerance for risk and his suitability for the Fed job. I am glad that the reporter at least mentioned the Shleifer affair as a factor in Summers's exit from the presidency, though the reference to Shleifer is too obscure to serve as anything but a reminder to the small number of people who knew about it already. The same reporter wrote a stronger piece several years ago. Summers's defenders ...

Skip the juice, go for whole fruit

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 29

Harvard researchers have found that people who ate at least two servings each week of certain whole fruits — particularly blueberries, grapes, and apples — reduced their risk for type 2 diabetes by as much as 23 percent in comparison to those who ate less than one serving per month.

Office Politics for the Pros

Harvard Business Review - Aug 29

Karen Dillon , author of the HBR Guide to Office Politics , talks with  Dorie Clark , author of Reinventing You . Download this podcast A written transcript will be available by September 9.

Hack attacks, explained

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 29

In a question-and-answer session, Jonathan Zittrain, co-founder of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, explains the latest hack attacks on major news media outlets.

New Study Predicts Wildfires Will Worsen with Climate Change

Harvard Magazine - Aug 29

Lightning, topography , and human-related activities start a large number of wildfires every year, but during the next 40 years it is climate change that will lead to a major increase in such blazes in the American West, according to a new Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) study. The study will appear in the October 2013 issue of Atmospheric Environment . “It turns out that, for the western United States, the biggest driver for fires in the future is temperature, and that result ...

Lending a Helping Hand

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Aug 29

HKS Serves, Harvard Kennedy School's signature day of service

Transparent artificial muscle plays music

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 29

Using a gel-based audio speaker, Harvard researchers have shown that electrical charges carried by ions, rather than electrons, can be put to meaningful use in fast-moving, high-voltage devices.

The Dangerous Tension Between CMOs and CIOs

Harvard Business Review - Aug 29

Business is largely about competition and, even within organizations, a healthy dose of rivalry between colleagues can be a good thing. However, a survey just conducted by Accenture Interactive (see The CMO-CIO Disconnect ) points to a downright unhealthy relationship in many C-Suites which can do nothing but damage to firms. At a time when many executives say that improving digital reach will be a significant differentiator for their companies, our research shows that two of the most important digital ...

Panel opens door to disabilities discussion

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 29

To address the growing numbers and concerns about disabilities, Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences Human Resources organized a community discussion titled “Working with People with Disabilities: What Happens After You Say Hello?”

Climbing the Wickersham Wall

Harvard Magazine - Aug 29

In June 1963, seven Harvard mountain climbers—new graduates Hank Abrons ’63 and Rick Millikan ’63, along with Peter Carman ’64, John Graham ’64, Don Jensen ’65, David Roberts ’65, and graduate student Chris Goetze ’61, [Ph.D. ’70,] (at 23 the “old man” of the group)—set out to conquer a previously unscaled mountain face bigger than any on Everest. John Graham recalls their adventure and reports on the return trip he made with Carmen, Millikan, and Roberts this past June to celebrate ...

Shorenstein Center Welcomes Leaders in Media and Political Journalism for Fall 2013

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Aug 29

The Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, located at Harvard Kennedy School, is pleased to announce its 2013 Fall Fellows and Visiting Faculty

How to Manage Someone You Don't Like

Harvard Business Review - Aug 29

Everybody complains about incompetent bosses or dysfunctional co-workers , but what about irritating direct reports? What should you do if the person you manage drives you crazy? If the behavior is a performance issue, there's a straightforward way to address what's irking you — but what do you do when it's an interpersonal issue? Is it possible to be a fair boss to someone you'd avoid eating lunch with — or must you learn to like every member of your team? What the Experts Say Of course, your ...

Solving the Looming Talent Shortage in the Energy Industry

Harvard Business Review - Aug 29

These days, each passing season seems to mark a new weather record, whether hottest year in the US, driest drought in Australia, or a record heat wave in South Korea. The trend towards more extreme weather appears to be continuing around the globe. So just when electric systems need to operate flawlessly — whether to power air conditioners, pump water, or heat homes — long-term challenges to power grids are multiplying. From the US to Europe and Asia, electricity players are facing a similar ...

Food, gender, culture

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 29

Harvard Summer School is big, young, diverse, and challenging — qualities summed up nicely by a course on food, gender, and American culture.

X-CAPM: An Extrapolative Capital Asset Pricing Model

HBS Working Knowledge - Aug 29

by Nicholas Barberis, Robin Greenwood, Lawrence Jin, and Andrei Shleifer Executive Summary — Many investors assume that stock prices will continue rising after they have previously risen, and will continue falling after they have previous fallen. This evidence, however, does not mesh with the predictions of many of the models used to account for other facts about aggregate stock market prices. Indeed, in most traditional models, expected returns are low when stock prices are high: in these models, ...

There Really Is Such a Thing as the Protestant Work Ethic

Harvard Business Review - Aug 29

The psychic harm from unemployment is about 40% worse for Protestants than for the general population, say André van Hoorn and Robbert Maseland of the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. Moreover, people living in Protestant societies are hurt more by being unemployed than people living in other societies, according to an analysis of subjective well-being data on nearly 150,000 people in 82 societies. An analysis of the data shows that the effects derive from an intrinsic appreciation of work ...

What Stops Leaders from Showing Compassion

Harvard Business Review - Aug 29

Most good people want to act compassionately at work. And recent research suggests that compassion also creates positive outcomes in organizations : People who experience compassion feel more committed to the organization and feel more positive emotions at work; when people receive bad news that is delivered with compassion, they remain more supportive of the organization; and acting with compassion can increase your own satisfaction and mitigate your own stress at work. And yet even if you want to be ...

Repression in China

Greg Mankiw's Blog - Aug 29

A professor in China brings this story to my attention: A renowned professor has confirmed online rumours that his peers will decide whether he will be expelled from China's most eminent university after he made a series of remarks in favour of free speech and constitutional governance. Economics professor Xia Yeliang of Peking University was told by his department that his fate would be decided by a faculty vote, he told the South China Morning Post on Monday. "They told me it's because of all the ...

Former FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski '91 will teach Fall Semester course at Harvard Law and Business Schools as Klinsky Professor of Practice for Leadership and Progress

HLS News - Aug 29

Julius Genachowski '91, who served as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission from 2009 until May of this year, will teach a course to students from Harvard Law School and Harvard Business School in the fall semester. The course, 'Running a Federal Agency: Lessons from Business, Technology and Game Theory,' will be offered jointly by the two schools.

Steven and Maureen Klinsky endow Professorship of Practice for Leadership and Progress at Harvard Law School

HLS News - Aug 29

Harvard Law School Dean Martha Minow has announced that Steven Klinsky J.D. '81 M.B.A. '79, and his wife, Maureen Klinsky, have endowed the Steven and Maureen Klinsky Professorship of Practice for Leadership and Progress at HLS. The new chair is the first endowed professorship of practice established at Harvard Law School, and is designed to bring visiting leaders from a wide range of fields beyond law to campus to teach and bring inspiration and broad perspective to the school and, more generally, to ...

Wildfires projected to worsen with climate change

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 28

A Harvard model predicts that by 2050, wildfire seasons will be three weeks longer, up to twice as smoky, and will burn a wider area in the western United States.

Life After Professional Tennis

The Spark - Aug 28

Around Extension Chanda Rubin discusses how she embraced her education after playing professional tennis. This has been a big year for former professional tennis player Chanda Rubin. Not only was she inducted into the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame, but she also celebrated a significant personal milestone, earning her undergraduate degree. In the video below, Rubin reflects on her professional tennis career and her desire to embrace the educational opportunities at Harvard Extension School. read more

One goal, many players

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 28

GoAmazon2014 is part of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA), the largest umbrella for research in the Amazon, which explores everything from social issues to scientific inquiries.

Atop the Amazon rainforest

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 28

Harvard air chemistry expert Scot Martin is working with the Department of Energy, as well as several international partners, to track how pollution above the pristine Amazon rainforest is changing the climate.

Who needed a stapler?

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 28

Harvard Professors Eric Mazur and Gary King, together with postdoctoral fellow Brian Lukoff, took an idea about how to change classroom teaching and created a company based on it. When the company sold last spring, it didn’t even own a stapler.

Fueling the entrepreneurial spirit

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 28

A growing number of Harvard faculty members, fellows, and even students are looking to take their innovative ideas a step further and bring them to the marketplace.

Meet MC/MPA Mason Fellow Dorothy Tuma

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Aug 28

This year, several students have volunteered to introduce themselves through the Harvard Kennedy School School admissions blog with a self-authored post.

Meet MC/MPA Mason Fellow Dorothy Tuma

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Aug 28

This year, several students have volunteered to introduce themselves through the Harvard Kennedy School School admissions blog with a self-authored post.

A Light Footprint Can Lead to Powerful Business Gains

Harvard Business Review - Aug 28

Some of the best current lessons on how to adapt to our changing business environment come from the realm of military doctrine . And one key methodology stems from mid-1990s, when students at the U.S. Army War College were told repeatedly they were preparing for leadership roles in a "Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, and Ambiguous" (VUCA) world. Barack Obama's "Light Footprint" doctrine of warfare, featuring novel uses of drones, cyberweapons, special forces, allies, and proxies, is an early adaptation to the ...

How a Cosmo Woman Kick-Started Her Brand

Harvard Business Review - Aug 28

For 14 fun and pretty thrilling years, I was the editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan magazine — and, yes, that means I was the one responsible for wicked coverlines like "Mattress Moves So Hot His Thighs Will Burst into Flames." But it also means I had close-up view of the modern consumer landscape. And in the year since I left the magazine, I've had a chance to distill some of the the strategies I used to make Cosmo number one on the newsstand (and keep it there). First, a little background. ...

Berkman Center Open House (9/9); DPLAFest Registration Now Open

Berkman Center - Newsfeed - Aug 28

Berkman Events Newsletter Template Upcoming Events / Digital Media August 28, 2013 The Digital Problem Solving Initiative (DPSI) is a Harvard-wide pilot program that aims to bring together students, faculty, university officials, fellows, and staff to work in teams on practicable and concrete digital problems and opportunities. Apply here to be a Berkman DPSI Pioneer. special event Berkman Center Fall 2013 Open House Monday, September 9 , starting at 4pm ET, Harvard Law School, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein ...

Is Bias Fixable?

Harvard Business Review - Aug 28

"As a brown woman, your chances of being seen and heard in the world are next to nothing," he said. "For your ideas to be seen, they need to be edgier." He paused, as if to ruminate on this, before continuing. "But if you are edgy, you will be too scary to be heard." This was the advice I got from a marketing guru when I asked for his help with titling my second book. I was confused, as I couldn't figure out how this answer had any relationship to my original question. I walked — somewhat dazed ...

Matt Baum on the Situation in Syria

Harvard Kennedy School - News - Aug 28

Intervention in Syria, the news media and public opinion: Research chat with Matt Baum

Don't Just Serve — Enable: A New Model for IT Organizations

Harvard Business Review - Aug 28

The classic model of an IT organization as a central point of control over all things data was never ideal, and today it simply doesn't work. Business users need increasingly fast, broad, and flexible access to data. It is no longer possible for IT to address every single business request. So, what's an organization to do? A small shift in thinking and process—moving IT from a serving mode to an enabling mode—can make a huge difference. The traditional IT model is much like a classic ...

Inside Comcast's $30 Billion TV Bet

HBS Bulletin - Aug 28

NBCU's Steve Burke has weeded out executives and scrubbed the culture. Read More >

Can Social Media Make Customers More Civilized?

Harvard Business Review - Aug 28

Social media often make it a little too easy for good people to behave badly. (Think, for example, of the nastier comments one sees on this site.) When those good people are your customers or clients, those consequences can be excruciating and expensive. Some customers, alas, aren't above being bullies, blackmailers and/or jerks. They live for the opportunity to vent their unhappiness through Twitter, Yelp, or Amazon. Companies live in justifiable fear that a couple of complaints going viral could ...

With Labor Costs Easing, U.S. Companies Invest Less in Technology

Harvard Business Review - Aug 28

American labor costs have been so well contained of late that the proportion of nonfarm business revenue going toward wages, salaries, and benefits hit a record low 57.9% in the first quarter of 2012, the most recent period for which figures are available, says the Wall Street Journal . A decade earlier, the share was 62.7% . But when labor costs are low, companies are less willing to invest in labor-saving technology; the 10-year period ended in 2011, the latest on record, was the weakest for tech ...

Back

My Biased Coin - Aug 28

I haven't posted for a while, primarily because I started by sabbatical by going to Copenhagen for most of August. I was primarily visiting the IT University of Copenhagen, thanks to the outstanding hospitality of Rasmus Pagh. I also saw Mikkel Thorup, who has started at the University of Copenhagen (which is different from the IT University of Copenhagen), and stopped by the MADALGO summer school. Copenhagen is a wonderful city -- lots to do and see, but not overwhelming, and with great features like ...

Strange new rules of a 'Cool War': Feldman looks at the unprecedented dynamic of cooperation and conflict between the U.S. and China

HLS News - Aug 28

In his new book "Cool War: The Future of Global Competition," Harvard Law School Professor Noah Feldman turns his focus on the world-changing implications of the conflict between the world's fastest-growing and established dominant powers: China and the United States. 

Slowing the work treadmill

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 27

Harvard Business School Professor Teresa Amabile compares much of work life to running on a treadmill. People try to keep up with the demands of meetings, email, interruptions, deadlines, all while trying to be more productive and creative, she says, yet on many days they seem to make no progress at all, especially in creative endeavors. Amabile suggests the answer is to do less.

Radcliffe Open Yard

Radcliffe Institute - Aug 27

Date and Time: Monday, October 28, 2013, 4:00 PM Other Radcliffe Yard Join us on Monday, October 28, 2013 at Radcliffe Yard for activities that highlight the Radcliffe lnstitute's dedication to generating ideas in the arts, humanities, sciences, and social sciences and to sharing them broadly.

The 50th Anniversary of the Presidential Report on American Women

Radcliffe Institute - Aug 27

Date and Time: Tuesday, October 15, 2013, 2:00 PM Conferences & Symposia Knafel Center (formerly Radcliffe Gymnasium) In 1961 President John F. Kennedy established a Presidential Commission to examine and report on the status of American women.

Paws to refresh

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 27

On the Science Center Plaza for the next several Thursdays, Harvard freshmen and others will be able to spend time lingering at a small petting zoo, part of a new Common Spaces initiative.

Giant Magellan Milestone

Harvard Magazine - Aug 27

In Tucson’s late summer heat , under the steeply raked eastern stands of the University of Arizona Stadium (“Home of the Wildcats”), technicians at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab this past weekend cast the third enormous mirror for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT), planned to be the world’s largest and scheduled for partial operation by decade’s end. Although the telescope is designed to have six 8.4-meter (27.5-foot) asymmetrical mirrors ringing a seventh, central mirror once in ...

Harvard men’s basketball unveils 2013-14 schedule

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 27

The 103rd season of Harvard basketball opens Nov. 10 against Holy Cross as part of a tripleheader at TD Garden.

Constructing Your Career Castle

Harvard Business Review - Aug 27

As the story goes, Walt Disney had a key piece of advice to the executives planning the Magic Kingdom: Build the castle first . Disney understood that everyone involved in achieving his vision — from the Madison Avenue advertisers selling it to the guys hacking their way through the mosquito-infested Florida swamp — needed literally to see the beauty of this vision to remind them what they were working toward. So the first thing to rear up out of the swamp was, in fact, Cinderella's Castle, ...

The First 90 Days in a New CIO Position

Harvard Business Review - Aug 27

Perhaps the most exciting (and challenging) aspect of working in a progressive IT organization is the pace of technological change. It requires that IT staff — and our customers — are continuously learning. Managing this rapid change and fostering innovation while "keeping the trains running on time" is the primary leadership role required of any CIO, new or old. I fundamentally believe that these need not be mutually exclusive goals. As I approach my own new role as CIO at Harvard Business ...

First Look: August 27

HBS Working Knowledge - Aug 27

Misunderstanding your health care coverage One of the goals of the onrushing ObamaCare health care program is to present consumers with easily explained choices among vendors. The problem is that health care coverage is anything but easy to understand, and many consumers fail to grasp the basics of programs they already have. A better approach, according to the recent paper "Consumers' Misunderstanding of Health Insurance" is to create simplified insurance programs from the start. "Rather than trying to ...

The Impact of Patent Wars on Firm Strategy: Evidence from the Global Smartphone Market

HBS Working Knowledge - Aug 27

by Yongwook Paik and Feng Zhu Executive Summary — Patents and patent enforcement strategies have become an essential part of firms' competitive strategies: They are used as isolating mechanisms to protect intellectual property or as defense mechanisms to help obtain access to external innovations. Using data from the global smartphone market, the authors of this paper investigate the effect of escalated patent litigations—the so-called patent war—on firm strategy. The smartphone industry ...

Young scientists awarded $719,701 in grants

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 27

This year, Harvard researchers are receiving $719,701 in funding from the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, formerly known as the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression, or NARSAD.

Macroprudential Regulation

Greg Mankiw's Blog - Aug 27

A wise column from John Cochrane .

Design Your Top Jobs to Appeal to the Goals of Top Talent

Harvard Business Review - Aug 27

A few leading-edge companies are making real progress in increasing the proportion of women in their executive ranks by turning the problem on its head. Rather than focusing their efforts on fitting the candidates to the jobs (through, say, more mentoring and training), they are taking practical steps to make the positions more attractive to their already high-potential candidates. Take Australia-based hearing-aid manufacturer Cochlear, which when faced with a chronic underrepresentation of women in its ...

U.S. Poised to Become the Low-Cost Manufacturer of the Developed World

Harvard Business Review - Aug 27

The United States is becoming one of the lowest-cost countries for manufacturing in the developed world: By 2015, average manufacturing costs in Germany, Japan, France, Italy, and the UK will be 8% to 18% higher than in the U.S., estimates Boston Consulting Group. Among the biggest drivers of this advantage are the costs of labor (adjusted for productivity), natural gas, and electricity. The U.S. could capture up to 5% of total exports from these developed countries by the end of the decade, BCG says.

To Go from Big Data to Big Insight, Start with a Visual

Harvard Business Review - Aug 27

Although data visualization has produced some of the most captivating artistic displays in recent memory, some of which have found their way into exhibits at the New York Museum of Modern Art and countless art installations around the world, business leaders are asking: is data visualization actionable? I think so. In my role as the Scholar-in-Residence at The New York Times R&D Lab, I am collaborating with one of the world's most advanced digital R&D teams to figure out how we can draw actionable insights ...

The dream, 50 years later

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 26

Thousands will join President Obama at the Lincoln Memorial on Wednesday to mark the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and celebrate a powerful moment in the Civil Rights Movement. The commemoration stirs not only potent memories of that day, but for some with Harvard ties, mixed emotions about the march’s lasting legacy.

John McCain's Cable TV Bill Is Anti-Capitalist

Harvard Business Review - Aug 26

My cable television needs are simple — give me the four staple network stations and a few business channels (for professional reasons) and I'm happy. When I called my local cable provider, a rep cheerfully informed me that the price for a basic network package is roughly $9 a month. Not bad , I thought. But when I explained my interest in adding Bloomberg TV and CNBC, the rep replied that I'd have to upgrade to the "Digital Starter" package, which would run me about $70 a month. Whoa — an extra ...

Boxes, bins, and bedding

Harvard Gazette Online - Aug 26

Harvard Yard began to come alive again Monday morning as the Class of 2017 arrived on campus.

Steve Ballmer's Big Lesson for the Rest of Us

Harvard Business Review - Aug 26

The business media lit up over the weekend with the news that Steve Ballmer, the college friend who worked alongside Bill Gates to build Microsoft and was heir to the CEO job, will step down within a year. Ballmer, whose skills were in many ways complementary to Gates', took the helm of an already massive organization as it entered an era of relentless disruptive innovation by competitors. He managed to hold the stock price on a pretty even keel, but no better than that. It's worth taking a step back to ...